QGIS SEXTANTE Modeler: Automate yield data processing

This is a followup post to Processing harvest yield data to grid / raster where I outlined my yield data processing steps. This post shows how I use the Modeler in SEXTANTE to automate this process utilising SAGA algorithms.

The idea of the modeler for me is to save time and keep consistent processes. In the screen shot below you can see that the model requires the yield data point file (where the Dry Yield table column needs selecting), paddock boundary and the grid and filtered points output file location. The model takes care of all the processing steps.

Select yield data point file to be processed and choose output location. The modeler does the rest!
Select yield data point file to be processed and choose output location. The modeler does the rest!

While constructing the model the only tricky part was making sure I had a separate ‘Extent’ field to input into the ‘Shapes to Grid’ algorithm. Even though I always leave this blank, it is required for the algorithm to realise the extent is just the minimum covering extent of the input shape file.

SEXTANTE model editing screen displaying input fields and algorithms involved in the yield data processing
SEXTANTE model editing screen displaying input fields and algorithms involved in the yield data processing
Yield Map: L3 Chickpeas 2012
Yield Map: L3 Chickpeas 2012

A few years ago I used to use model builder in ArcGIS and really missed it when I no longer had access to ESRI software. The SEXTANTE Modeler fills that gap and allows a combination of algorithms from several different toolboxes.

Some more advanced applications of Sextante Modeler are available here.

Setting up QGIS for Precision Agriculture GIS: Free Software

QGIS rivals ArcGIS as desktop GIS software especially within Precision Agriculture. The difference is that QGIS is Open Source and therefore free to use for personal and commercial use. Open Source has many other advantages. If you are familiar with ArcGIS you should give QGIS a go.

If you run Windows I recommend installing using the OSGeo4W installer. Run the ‘Desktop Express Install’.

‘Out of the box’ QGIS is very capable. But it is not until you install a few powerful plugins that it’s real potential is revealed. So far the plugins I use on a daily basis are: SEXTANTE and Table Manager. SEXTANTE is not much good to me without SAGA. Together these make available a comprehensive list of common Vector and Raster GIS algorithms. Optionally install TauDEM and Orfeo (I have installed these but not yet used them).

Setting up SEXTANTE in QGIS 1.8 (Windows 7 & 8)

Install Sextante Plugin (In QGIS: Plugins > Fetch Python Plugins).

So SEXTANTE has access to the SAGA algorithms it needs to be downloaded and installed: SAGA.

Configure SAGA in SEXTANTE (In QGIS: Analysis > SEXTANTE options > SAGA), insert SAGA folder and check Activate box.

Similar to SAGA, download and install TauDEM 5.0.6 & MPICH2 (make sure you follow install instructions on the download page).

Configure TauDEM in SEXTANTE (In QGIS: Analysis > SEXTANTE options > TauDEM), insert MPICH2 bin directory, TauDEM command line tools folder and check Activate box.

Install Table Manager

Plugins > Fetch Python Plugins

Search for Table Manager and click Install.

With these two plugins, especially SEXTANTE, QGIS becomes extremely capable.

SEXTANTE with SAGA in QGIS 1.8

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